Nov 18 Inaugural Joseph Larner Lecture in Pharmacology: Morris J. Birnbaum, M.D., Ph.D.

November 18, 2015 by Health System Enterprise Calendar

[JHCC Auditorium] Please join the Pharmacology Department for the Inaugural Joseph Larner Memorial Lecture in Pharmacology on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 in the Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium. The program begins at 3 PM and features:

• 3:00 PM — Opening Remarks by Douglas Bayliss, PhD, Joseph & Frances Larner Chair and Professor of Pharmacology, Professor of Anesthesiology
• 3:15 PM — David Brautigan, PhD: Unexpected Functions of an Ancient Protein Phosphatase. Dr. Brautigan is the F. Palmer Weber Medical Research Professor, Departments of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, and the Director, Center for Cell Signaling, University of Virginia.
• 4:00 PM — Keynote Lecture by Morris J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD: Glycogen Synthesis and Beyond: The Complex Regulation of Hepatic Metabolism. Dr. Birnbaum is the Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease (CVMED) Research Unit at Pfizer.
• 5:00 PM — Reception in Jordan 2ABC

Keynote Speaker Morris J. Birnbaum, M.D., Ph.D. is Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease (CVMED) Research Unit at Pfizer, which focuses on developing therapies to treat, slow or prevent disease progression and improve the quality of life of patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular (CV) and kidney diseases. Dr. Birnbaum is a leading researcher in the signals that regulate and integrate metabolic pathways in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, and how they are disrupted in insulin resistant states.

http://www.pfizer.com/research/science_and_technology/meet_our_scientists/morris_j_birnbaum

Dr. Joseph Larner (January 9, 1921 — January 28, 2014) served as Chairman of the Pharmacology Department from 1969-1990. He led a distinguished career, garnering numerous scientific awards including the Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement in Diabetes Research, the Virginia Lifetime Achievement Award in Science, and he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Larner’s notable research was focused on the study of insulin activity with the goal of improving diabetes treatments and, in 1974, he founded the UVa Diabetes Center for Research. The Larner family–wife Frances and sons Andrew, James, and Paul–endowed the Joseph Larner Annual Memorial Lecture in Pharmacology to explore the pervasive role of metabolism/cell signaling in human disease. Gifts from the family, as well as Dr. Larner’s UVa colleagues and other scientists who respected his work, provide support for this annual lecture and continue Dr. Larner’s legacy at the School of Medicine.